Search results for Women

For having more women as leaders

Visible Women

Corporate world companies are still very much a boy’s club. Look inside the corner offices of Fortune 500 companies, and you’ll find just 24 women–a paltry 4.8%–sitting at the CEO desk. Those who are tapped are often brought in during times of crisis.

Clinical psychologists Susanne Bruckmüller and Nyla Branscombe conducted the 2010 study “The Glass Cliff: When and Why Women are Selected as Leaders in Crisis Contexts,” and found that women are tapped not because female characteristics are valued, but because the stereotypical male traits, such as being competitive and uncompromising, aren’t perceived as being helpful during a turnaround.

Does the glass cliff set up women for failure? Not necessarily, says Kira Makagon, executive vice president of innovation at RingCentral, a cloud-based phone provider. In fact, she looks at the opportunity as a chance to shine.

“Women need to stretch their experience from a functional background to a broader base,” she says. Once in leadership positions, Makagon and Miller say women need to be proactive to stay there. They offer five things women can do to survive the glass cliff:

1. Focus on what you want to achieve.

To move ahead, Makagon says to leave gender aside and focus on your professional strengths.

“In a predominantly male environment, women will be treated differently,” she says. “For example, if there is one chair in the room, it will probably be offered to you. But don’t dwell on the differences. Everyone is judged by their results.”

2. Network and find a mentor.

You can’t move up on your own, says Miller, author of Sleep Your Way to the Top: And Other Myths About Business Success (FG Press, 2014). “It’s vital to have others support you,” she says. “I made the biggest leap at Frito-Lay because I had a mentor who supported me and let everyone know how amazing I was. That catapulted my career.”

Miller says to make sure you’re always networking and building alliances. “You never know who could help you–a boss, peer, or underling,” she says. “People wanted to work for me and that’s how I got to senior management.”

3. Be comfortable with yourself.

Don’t try to change who you are to fit into a man’s world, says Makagon; it will be disingenuous. “In the typical old boys’ club, you’re going to hear men discussing sports,” she says. “I don’t follow teams, and I can’t participate in that conversation. Instead of changing who I am, I change the subject. I’ll ask, ‘Who’s seen what’s playing at opera house?’ Often, they look at me with that deer-in-the-headlights look, but it changes the landscape and puts you in the center.”

While you shouldn’t become someone you’re not, Makagon adds that sometimes it’s important to go with the flow.

“I was invited to a meeting at a cigar bar with the guys,” she says. “I didn’t smoke, but I did go along for the experience. Recognize that you’ll probably be the only woman there, and get comfortable being out of your element.”

4. Pay attention to your leadership style.

This is where women get derailed, says Miller. “Women are often stereotyped,” she says. “We can be accused of being (called) emotional when we may just be passionate, but it’s important not to let your personal style get in the way of being heard.”

Listen to the cues of others. While you don’t need to become someone else to succeed, Miller says you need to realize the most senior person in the room dictates the mood, pace, and atmosphere.

“To be successful, you have to understand that person and flex your style accordingly,” she says. Lead with the facts and listen to the corporate culture. “Once I changed my interactions with senior management and listened more carefully to their language, I suddenly was being heard.”

5. Recognize other women.

Makagon says when you climb the corporate ladder, it’s important to reach out to other women along the way.

How to innovate to reduce discrimination against women

SalaryHerHis

Is there really a discrimination again women?

The film shows what kind of images are showed by some commercial medias. The film showed American medias but in all industrialize countries, we can found these movies that gives this women’s vision.

Beyond medias, is there really some discriminations against women, and especially in industrialised countries ? Simple fact allows us to see the evidence; in Europe, in Russia and Australia, Women are less paid from 17% in comparison with Men, in United States 19%, in UK 21%, in Japan 33% and in Korea 38%. There is no country without any discrimination against women but Scandinavian and New Zealand countries have low discriminations.

But there are other discriminations that have higher consequence.

What are the ratio of Women who have Top Board responsibility?

The best, in Norway, 39% of Board seats are attributed to Women. In USA, 15,7%, in France, 12,7%, in UK, 12,5% and in Germany 11,2%. In the BRICST countries, Brazil, 5,1%, Russia 5,9%, India 5,3%, China 8,5%, South Africa 15,8% and Turkey 10,8%.

Women managers are 20% less paid that men in France; average salary discrimination is around 17% for all categories of Women jobs. Higher the level in the hierarchy is, higher the inequality is.

Anyway, progress is there but the equality will be long to obtain in the current trend…

In 1980, 25% of managers were female; in 2010, 38%.

25% of worldwide countries have legal restrictions on women’s right to work. There is some reductions of restrictions, decade after decade.

Around the world, almost 20% of national parliamentary seats are now occupied by women, up from 17.2% five years ago.

It will take more than 50 years in the current trend to reduce completely the discrimination against women. Can we accelerate the trend? It is up to all of us, women and men to be informed and to make some concrete actions to reduce them.

Check this very interesting blog with a lot of statistics about women’s discrimination

http://filipspagnoli.wordpress.com/stats-on-human-rights/statistics-on-discrimination/statistics-on-discrimination-of-women/#2

Women in Science & Technology: Critical for Innovation

women-in-tech

Since 2001, the National Science Foundation has invested more than $130 million to support ADVANCE projects at nearly 100 institutions of higher education and STEM-related, not-for-profit organizations across the U.S. CONNECT@RIT (Creating Opportunity Networks for Engagement and Collective Transformation) focuses on improving conditions for female STEM faculty, with a unique emphasis on women who are deaf and hard-of-hearing at the university. RIT (Rochester Institute of Technology) will address issues of recruitment, retention and advancement of female faculty through reassessment of some of its academic and human resource policies, expanding a newly established faculty mentoring program and increasing professional development and leadership opportunities.

Part of the NSF research included looking inward at RIT where a climate survey and examination of HR data trends led to the identification of barriers for women faculty. These ranged from the recruitment and advancement of women faculty to balancing work and life. RIT had only 23 percent of its female tenured and tenure track faculty in STEM disciplines, below the 30 percent average represented in U.S. colleges and universities, even though the number of female faculty had tripled at RIT over a 15-year period. Further data revealed gender-based, average salary gaps existed at each faculty rank, and that women left the faculty ranks at a rate nearly twice that of their male colleagues. These findings mirrored national trends for women in STEM careers in academia and in industry.

Among the Connect@RIT project goals includes attracting 30 percent female applicants for RIT STEM faculty positions, at least 75 percent of STEM departments achieving a critical mass of female faculty, retention rates for female faculty that closely mirror those of male faculty, and an increase in the percentage of women in academic leadership positions to a level which maps to their overall representation at RIT. The finish line for the project is five years out and the researchers have plenty of work ahead. But we are confident they will have a similar finish to last year’s race team.

In summary, a diverse and inclusive workforce is crucial for attracting and retaining top talent. This is especially true for colleges and universities, like RIT, that specialize in innovation. RIT has historically been a leader in developing new technologies, systems and approaches. RIT faculty and research teams often partner with business and industry leaders on research and development initiatives. In order to effectively continue in this capacity – to cultivate the best and brightest minds and to be an innovation resource for industry – everybody must proactively encourage diversity.

Diversity isn’t an altruistic aspiration; it’s a competitive demand.

Facebook Pressured to Take Action on Violence Against Women

o-FACEBOOK-RAPE-570

Inaction from the leader of social networks against Women is not anymore acceptable. This is true also for all the words that do not respect others. It is important to understand that it is part of the keys successes of future of social networks. The anonymity may encourage some of us to express what they have worse in them. Innovative Technologies should prevent public to may authorize to express this violence: how to make it?

Tech

Without a doubt, misogyny and anti-women hate speech exists on the Internet in spades. Part of the problem, of course, is anonymity; another part is inaction on the part of social networks like Facebook to police such content. But a recent open letter from Women, Action & the Media on the topic has elicited a response from Facebook that includes a promise to work harder to make the Internet a safe space for all.

Specifically, the open letter targets gender-based hate speech, much of which is tied in with threats and jokes about rape. According to the group, Facebook is overflowing with violent and offensive content targeting women. Specifically, the letter citing groups with names like “Raping your Girlfriend” and photographs of abused women with captions intended to elicit laughs.

“These pages and images are approved by your moderators, while you regularly remove content such as pictures of women breastfeeding

View original post 314 more words

Women & Technologies

 

women-in-tech

Women in Science & Tech: Critical for Innovation

Since 2001, the National Science Foundation has invested more than $130 million to support ADVANCE projects at nearly 100 institutions of higher education and STEM-related, not-for-profit organizations across the U.S. CONNECT@RIT (Creating Opportunity Networks for Engagement and Collective Transformation) focuses on improving conditions for female STEM faculty, with a unique emphasis on women who are deaf and hard-of-hearing at the university.

  o-FACEBOOK-RAPE-570

Facebook Pressured to Take Action

Without a doubt, misogyny and anti-women hate speech exists on the Internet in spades. Part of the problem, of course, is anonymity; another part is inaction on the part of social networks like Facebook to police such content. But a recent open letter from Women, Action & the Media on the topic has elicited a response from Facebook that includes a promise to work harder to make the Internet a safe space for all.

  GirlsAndScience

Girls & Math: to bust stereotypes

Do girls need special attention to science? Claude Steele has examined this very phenomenon closely for years and has identified it as a stereotype threat. The issue is much more complex than the very basic tendencies of what naturally interests either gender. He pinpoints the problem to what happens after girls follow their interests in science and math studies, when inevitable obstacles come up.

  HomegrowEffortWomenSillicon

Homegrown Efforts to Recruit Women in IT

Language in job description to exclude women. When Andreessen Horowitz, the venture capital firm, wanted to make sure its job postings were reaching the most diverse audience possible, its partners did what most people in Silicon Valley do when they spot a problem: they turned to software.

  Dr.KatherineJ.Kuchenbecker

How to touch virtual surface in the future?

Why you should listen to her? Could technology be more touchy feely? Mechanical engineer Katherine J. Kuchenbecker answers this question with a resounding ‘yes’. Katherine researches the design, control and performance of robotic systems that enable a user to touch virtual objects and distant environments as though they were real and within reach.

  WomenITUSA

Why is there less women in IT

In the early 1980s, women accounted for just over 37% of all US college students earning bachelor’s degrees in computer science. By 2010, that percentage had fallen to a little more than 17%, according to latest available data from the National Science Foundation.

 WomanGreenEnergy

Emerging Markets and Green Innovation

The green revolution must include and empower women. According to Katherine Lucey, founder & CEO of Solar Sister, the main cultural barrier for energy innovation in Africa is gender. Women need access to electricity to bring progress in the community.

 NCWIF

Women aspirations in Computing Talent

Aspirations in Computing is a talent development initiative of the National Center for Women & Information Technology (NCWIT). The program increases women’s participation in technology careers by providing encouragement, visibility, community, leadership opportunities, scholarships, and internships to aspiring technically inclined young women.

Homegrown Efforts to Recruit Women in Silicon Valley

HomegrowEffortWomenSillicon 
Margit Wennmachers, a partner at Andreessen Horowitz

Language in job description to exclude women

When Andreessen Horowitz, the venture capital firm, wanted to make sure its job postings were reaching the most diverse audience possible, its partners did what most people in Silicon Valley do when they spot a problem: they turned to software.

They used programs that analyze the language in job descriptions to catch phrases that might turn off certain types of applicants:

  • Looking for a candidate who is “off the charts”? Chances are, not that many women will apply.
  • “That’s just not how women talk,” said Margit Wennmachers, a partner at the firm: “They say, ‘Must be highly competent.’ ” .

It is an example of many homegrown efforts across the Valley to change the face of the tech industry. There have always been big organizations hosting conferences and networking events for women. But newer efforts are springing up from inside companies.

To coach women leaders in Silicon Valley

There are programs to teach girls to code, like Girls Who Code, for which companies like Twitter and Google lend office space and teachers. CodeChix, started by engineers at companies like VMware, hosts coding workshops that promise to be “non-alpha.”

The Club is an application-only group trying to provide an alternative to golf courses and men’s membership clubs by coaching women leaders in Silicon Valley. It was founded by Annie Rogaski, a partner at Kilpatrick Townsend, a Valley law firm.

Rachel Sklar, who started a group called Change the Ratio, is introducing an organization called The List where members who pay have access to other women for advice, financing and conference speaking gigs.

“It’s to achieve the function of the classic old boys’ club, which funnels very easy advice and access and opportunity,” Ms. Sklar said.

People to review all job descriptions

At Andreessen Horowitz, the firm asks real people, not just software, to review all job descriptions, too — so in addition to the hiring manager, people who are women, African American and from other minority groups in Silicon Valley have input.

The firm also has a partner in charge of diversity who helps acquire a broad set of candidates for the firm’s talent agency, which its 200 portfolio companies tap for engineering and leadership roles. Despite those efforts, all of the firm’s investing partners are men.

“There’s a huge talent war going on, so we are doing a lot of things to try to surface all kinds of diverse talent and bubble that up to our portfolio companies,” Ms. Wennmachers said.

See articles from Claire Cain Miller

Related articles

Why is there less women in IT between 80’s and 2010 in USA?

WomenITUSA

In the early 1980s, women accounted for just over 37% of all US college students earning bachelor’s degrees in computer science. By 2010, that percentage had fallen to a little more than 17%, according to latest available data from the National Science Foundation.

Sheryl Sandberg is calling on women to be more assertive, or to “lean in,” as she writes in her book, Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead. The book comes out at a time when women are significantly under-represented in US data centers.

Last year, women held only 26% of the jobs in computer-related occupations, up from 25% from 2011. That slight uptick notwithstanding, the overall number of female IT professionals has declined steadily since 2000, when women’s share of the computer-related jobs pool hit a peak of nearly 30%, according to the National Center for Women & Information Technology (NCWIT).

Sandberg’s book has been criticised for its focus on “changing the women rather than changing the system,” said Jenny Slade, communications director at NCWIT. “But frankly, if she’d written a polemic on institutional bias in the workplace, she’d have been criticised for painting women as victims.”

Kim Stevenson, vice president and CIO at Intel, one of 24 female CIOs in Fortune 100 companies, said her company’s success in increasing the number of female employees in mid- to senior-level technical jobs since 2004 isn’t a fluke. Stevenson noted that Intel offers mentoring programs and opportunities for network-building for women – activities that Sandberg champions. The Women at Intel Network has 22 chapters.

Stevenson doesn’t share Sandberg’s view that progress for women has stalled, though she agrees that more can be done.

Karie Willyerd, vice president of learning and social adoption at SAP, said that unflattering stereotypes, like the depictions of engineers in the popular comic strip Dilbert, may have discouraged young girls from thinking about IT careers. But recent moves by building block maker Lego and other companies to create products aimed at exposing young girls to engineering could begin to change the cultural message, she added.

Je suis Charlie : no innovation without free ideas

JeSuisCharlie

There is no way with integrism and destruction of people and ideas.

There is no innovation without free idea and ability to think what women an men want to think.

There is no possible solution if there is not the indignation of every citizen facing human barbarity.

Freedom of thought must be defended by all.

Africa: G Days Cameroon IT Innovation 2014

GDAYSCAMEROONIOI14

Google Developpers Group ( GDG ) of Cameroon organizes G DAYS Innovative Ideas Open 14 of 1 to 2 March 2014 at the Faculty of Industrial Engineering of Douala.

G DAYS Cameroon Open Innovative Ideas ( GDays IOI) is a national event which aims to create a technological lever arm in the IT ecosystem Cameroon innovation , boost students’ creativity and enhance the ability of firms to enter business opportunities.

G 14 DAYS Cameroon IOI follow the path begun by the first edition by adding a focus on the ( secondary and university ) education as a lever for innovation, the involvement of women in the technology field as strength and thinking work and efficiency in business and entrepreneurship in young as vector smarter management and the introduction of ” just in time” for better capitalizing on business opportunities.

The goal this year is to bring together more than 2,000 IT enthusiasts , students , developers, entrepreneurs and businesses around IT innovation , with an emphasis on solving social issues in Africa, especially those from Cameroon .

Powered by the slogan ” Innovation also be able to adapt existing technologies to the realities of Africa” ​​, the IOI GDAYS 14 promises a rich set of sessions around Cloud Computing , Google Apps, the ” Smart Cities ” , robotics, mobile development , web development , etc. . led by international experts and the best local experts.

Check the web site of the event: http://gdgcameroon.org/

FR: Créer un environnement où fleurissent l’innovation et l’esprit d’entreprendre

 mena innovation and entrepreneurship

 

English Version

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Lancer une entreprise qui marche ne se résume pas à apprendre comment établir un business plan ou remplir des demandes de subventions.

Cela implique un large éventail de compétences, aussi bien générales que techniques : savoir gérer une jeune entreprise, motiver ses employés, former une équipe solide, créer un produit qui réponde aux besoins spécifiques d’un marché, s’adapter à des situations et des comportements de consommation en constante évolution, comprendre comment passer d’un concept intéressant à une activité viable… Il n’est toutefois pas possible d’acquérir ces compétences, ni donc d’assurer la réussite des entreprises, sans un environnement porteur. Les entrepreneurs potentiels ont besoin d’un « écosystème » qui leur permette d’acquérir les bonnes compétences, et qui promeuve et nourrisse l’innovation. Pour la région du Moyen-Orient et de l’Afrique du Nord (MENA), cette exigence se traduit par la nécessité d’une mutation culturelle vis-à-vis de l’entrepreneuriat.

MENA: l’émergence d’un écosystème naissant

Ces cinq dernières années, on a pu observer l’émergence progressive d’un tel écosystème dans la région. Les quelques entreprises qui ont réussi dans ce contexte en évolution appartiennent au secteur privé et ont généralement été créées par des membres de la diaspora ou par des entrepreneurs qui ont étudié ou lancé une activité à l’étranger. Ces chefs d’entreprise ont la particularité de bénéficier d’un accès aux réseaux et marchés internationaux. Ils sont aussi animés par des motivations de réussite claires : ils investissent aussi bien leur temps que leur argent dans leur société. Ces éléments sont les conditions d’un écosystème de l’entreprise performant et qu’il convient d’encourager davantage. Les pouvoirs publics doivent savoir que pour renforcer la croissance par l’innovation, il est nécessaire de comprendre et promouvoir les investissements dans la recherche et le développement, cultiver les compétences requises et mettre en place un environnement entrepreneurial fonctionnel et efficace, ainsi que les mécanismes permettant d’encourager la collaboration entre les secteurs public et privé.

Deux initiatives de la Banque Mondiale

La Banque mondiale a lancé deux initiatives pour soutenir cet écosystème naissant et promouvoir l’innovation et l’esprit d’entreprise dans la région MENA. Le premier programme, qui consiste à « soutenir l’écosystème pour encourager un entrepreneuriat dynamique » (Supporting the Ecosystem for Fostering a Dynamic Entrepreneurship), est financé par le Mécanisme d’octroi de dons pour le développement (a), un dispositif de la Banque mondiale qui finance des partenariats régionaux. Ce programme s’appuie sur la collaboration entre deux des principales pépinières d’entreprises de la région, Oasis500 et Wamda, afin de renforcer le soutien qu’elles apportent aux projets de création d’entreprise et aux jeunes startups. En plus d’étendre le mentorat, le développement des compétences et l’accès aux investisseurs, ces structures vont également faire appel aux parties prenantes (pouvoirs publics, universités, investisseurs et autres pépinières) dans chaque pays afin de développer la collaboration et de généraliser le transfert et le partage des connaissances et compétences stratégiques.

La seconde initiative intervient au niveau des politiques à mener. Elle rassemble, autour de la Banque mondiale, des membres du secteur privé, du monde universitaire, de groupes de réflexion, de la société civile et des pouvoirs publics, tous réunis pour créer une communauté de spécialistes dont l’objectif est de promouvoir le changement par le biais de l’innovation et de la technologie. Baptisée « The How-to of Innovation, Technology and Entrepreneurship (ITE) » (« Les clés de l’innovation, de la technologie et de l’entrepreneuriat »), cette initiative a été lancée l’année dernière à Prague. Elle encourage les activités d’échange, de réseautage et d’apprentissage au sein de la communauté. Son objectif consiste à aider les pays de la région à engager des réformes politiques qui promeuvent les différents éléments nécessaires à une économie prospère et innovante. Cette initiative offre aux participants l’opportunité de connaître les expériences d’autres pays et de mieux comprendre la façon dont les pouvoirs publics peuvent apporter leur soutien dans ce domaine.