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  Jamaican-delegation20130514C

Jamaica: hub of innovation in Caribbean?

The Jamaican group was particularly thrilled to meet the founder of SUP, Nicolas Shea, a Stanford-educated entrepreneur who was recruited by the then minister of economy, Juan Andrés Fontaine, to join his staff as his entrepreneurship adviser. Only days after Shea relocated to Chile, a massive earthquake struck in February 2010, causing more than $15 billion in damages.

  solarimpulse

Switzerland: Solar Impulse project

Solar Impulse is a Swiss long-range solar powered aircraft project. The project eventually hopes to achieve the first circumnavigation of the Earth by a piloted fixed-wing aircraft using only solar power. The project is led by Swiss psychiatrist and aeronaut Bertrand Piccard.

  Social Media Addiction

Australia: Social Network addiction

The 2013 Yellow Social Media Report has analyzed that a growing number of Australians are using social network at an addictive rate wherever they can, even in toilet cubicles.

  vietcombank

Vietnam: Bank to embrace IT innovation

IT was becoming more and more important to the financial security and operational efficiency of banking services, State Bank of Viet Nam (SBV) Governor Nguyen Van Binh said at a banking technology conference in Hanoi, mid May 2013.

  20130510-193005.jpg

Poland: innovation can be pushed

The 2012 Global Innovation Index ranking, prepared by the World Intellectual Property Organization, ranked Poland as the EU’s third-least innovative economy in 2012, with worse results recorded only by Greece and Romania.

  10AfricanInnovation

Africa: 10 innovators to watch

African entrepreneurs are using technology to develop ideas to introduce products and services to compete within the continent’s burgeoning marketplace. With the level of challenges that tech start-ups face in competing within the broader technology space, business incubation, funding and other resources have emerged as focal points for industry regulators and governments.

  PoorITInnovationCanada

Canada: Poor grade in IT innovation

Canada ranks second-to-last among its peers in venture capital investment and business R&D spending. And the rest of the report card doesn’t get much better, as Canada ranks 13th in the 16-country How Canada Performs benchmarking.

  ColombiaMedellin

Colombia: Medellín, 2013 innovation capital

Medellín was named “World Capital Innovation” in 2013 by the Wall Street Journal and the Urban Life Institute. Consecration to the Colombian city.

 TataNanoFrugalInnovation

India: Frugal innovation approach

“The frugal innovation” is synonymous with quality products and services, accessible to all. Sam Pitroda, an ardent advocate of this approach, wants to make innovation the driving force of growth.

 IrishSmartInnovation

Europe: TOP4 leaders on Innovation

This post is based on an European memo provided on March 26, 2013 about Innovation Union Scoreboard. It provides an overview of the research and innovation performance of EU Member States and associated and neighbouring countries, as measured by the Innovation Union Scoreboard 2013.

 WomenITUSA

USA: Why less women in IT?

In the early 1980s, women accounted for just over 37% of all US college students earning bachelor’s degrees in computer science. By 2010, that percentage had fallen to a little more than 17%, according to latest available data from the National Science Foundation.

 UKInvest12millions

UK: £12 million for IT innovation

The UK’s Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) has announced £12 million in new funding for six research projects looking at IT innovation in manufacturing.

 DeutschePostDHL

Germany: Deutsche Post DHL & Innovation

Deutsche Post DHL has just been awarded the German Industry Innovation Award (“Innovationspreis der Deutschen Wirtschaft”) in the category of “innovative HR concepts” for its Generations Pact, a trend-setting model for designing and facilitating age-based working solutions.

 FuturGOVAsia

Singapore: Innovation Centre

Nanyang Polytechnic (NYP) in Singapore, has partnered with Samsung to drive research in new educational environments, mobile applications, and retail technology.

Nigerian scientist wins MIT’s World Top Young Innovators Award

images-Yemi_Adesokan_924237268

Yemi Adesokan, 35- year based Nigerian born researcher, has put his country’s name on the map of nations of innovation.

Adesokan’s discovery which has potential to change the way mankind responds to disease pathogens, according to experts, may bring an end the era of increased burden of drug resistance in the world particularly, in sub Saharan Africa.

When he moved to United States in 1996, little did the young innovator have realise that he was going to rub shoulders with some of the greatest names in scientific technology.

But today, Adesokan who has been listed by Technology Review, an independent media company owned by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, (MIT) USA. as one of the TR35 Award of the 2011 World top innovators. Past recipients have included Sergey Brin (Google), Mark Zuckerberg (Facebook), and Konstantin Novoselev (later a Nobel Laureate in Physics).

Adesokan is being so specially honoured for his work in the application of next generation sequencing to clinical diagnostics. Adesokan, who is also the founder of Pathogenica Inc., was selected as a member of the TR35 class of 2011 by a panel of expert judges and the editorial staff of Technology Review, who evaluated more than 300 nominations.

This work is being carried out by a biotechnology startup that I founded with Prof George Church of Harvard Medical School DNA technology. The Pathogenica’s test kits are able to identify the presence, allowing for physicians to screen for multiple diseases with accurate results and a rapid turnaround.

Sequencing technologies have improved a million – fold in the past seven years, bringing scientists a wealth of individual genomics and the key now is to employ the data to improve clinical practice. The DNA sequence of each individual or organism is unique, and is the most detailed signature for identification.

This year marks one decade since the completion of the Human Genome Project, a three billion-dollar effort to sequence a human genome.

A major issue in Nigeria today, is that some sterilised water may contain harmful pathogens. The technology is useful in screening a range of pathogens in water, livestock (poultry, etc.), and in food manufacturing. The key point for this technology is its high multiple. As it scales up, we actually see a reduction in price.

With the innovation, the cost of DNA sequencing has dropped more than 40,000_fold since that time to just $5,000 today. The price continues to drop. We are applying this fast, inexpensive technology in a unique way to improve routine clinical diagnostics.

The age of the re-emergent technologies

Re-emergence of technologies

Ryan Raffaelli, of Harvard Business School, has examined examples of “re-emergent technologies” in detail. The most striking example is the Swiss mechanical-watch industry. In the 1970s it was almost washed away by a tide of cheaper and more accurate digital watches. Today the industry is more successful than ever, providing the country’s largest source of exports after pharmaceuticals and machinery, and the engine of its revival is the old-fashioned wind-up watch.

There are plenty of other examples of re-emergent technologies. Sales of fountain pens collapsed in the 1950s with the arrival of cheap ballpoints; since the mid-1970s they have enjoyed a steady revival. Trams looked destined to become nothing more than tourist attractions in proudly quaint cities such as San Francisco and Paris. But hundreds of cities in the world have either installed new tram systems or have plans to do so. Sales of vinyl LPs in the world have increased from almost nothing in 1993 to more than some millions in 2013. The number of independent bookshops is rising for the first time in decades.

How do businesses go about reviving old technologies in the face of so much innovation? Mr Raffaelli argues that the key to success lies in redefining the product’s value and meaning. Swiss watchmakers redefined their products as status goods rather than a means of telling the time. That they are so much harder to make than digital watches added immeasurably to their desirability. Independent booksellers are redefining themselves as communities where people who care about books meet and socialise. Trams are re-emerging as a green solution to both pollution and urban sprawl: a striking number of the cities that are adopting them are formless sunbelt cities.

This redefinition demands a careful balance between tradition and change. Revival businesses often need to cultivate a close relationship with their craftsmen and customers, who may see themselves as guardians of a great tradition rather than mere employees or consumers. The Swiss watch industry arguably survived only because collectors kept paying record prices for watches at auctions and skilled craftsmen refused to abandon the old ways: when Zenith decided to throw away its mechanical watchmaking moulds at the height of what Swiss refer to as “the quartz crisis”, one old-timer decided to store them in a shed instead, wheeling them out once again when the luxury market took off. Revival businesses need to peddle their back-story remorselessly.

However, while peddling their traditions and reassuring customers and craftsmen that they are holding true to them, revival businesses also need to be willing to change. Nicolas Hayek and Ernst Thomke saved the Swiss watch industry from impending death by applying a succession of electric shocks. In a series of deals they brought together a bunch of ailing businesses into the mighty Swatch Group, whose sales last year reached SFr8.8 billion ($9.5 billion). They fought back against cheap digital watches by first redefining Swiss watches as fashion items, with Swatches, and then redefining them as luxury items, with brands such as Breguet, Blancpain and Omega which sell watches for six-figure sums.

Revival industries need to be willing to take tough decisions: for example, sacrificing market share to new entrants while holding firm on price. They also have to be ready to reorientate themselves to new markets: the Chinese have proved enthusiastic buyers of Western heritage goods.

FloorInMotion: wearable object from Tarkett

TARKETT

FloorInMotion coating is connected to detect falls in the elderly in order to assist them in the shortest possible time while promoting their independence and remain at home.

The “Silver Economy” becomes a major issue in society. And growth stimulates innovation into objects connected to the elderly, to assist them in daily life and reduce their loss of independence.

Faced with an aging population, the market for the elderly is growing. In fact, 22% of world population will be over 60 years old in 2050 (see http://foweb.unfpa.org/SWP2011/reports/FR-SWOP2011.pdf).

Introducing FloorInMotion

The world population aging has become in recent years a social issue and public health for the entire country. And most causes of loss of autonomy of the elderly is often domestic fall.

More people age progresses, the risk of falling is important , especially during the night or in the ponds. After a fall, waiting until the arrival of assistance can lead to medical complications. Unfortunately, falls are the leading cause of death in people over 65 in France for instance each year, 400,000 elderly fall accidentally and 12,000 people die from such a fall .

With his knowledge of the healthcare market , Tarkett has developed an innovative solution that detects abnormal situations. Patient side , the benefit to patients and their families is important because this system is discreet and not visible. That is why it is very popular with residents because it respects the dignity and privacy , unlike video surveillance or electronic bracelet.

Connected to equipment automation, the system also provides FloorInMotion comfort of daily life : the rising of the patient or during the night, the floor detects movement, which makes it possible to activate lights or open the shutters automatically .

Operation FloorInMotion

Tarket FloorInMotion designed as a simple and complete solution of an installed under the floor sensor that detects abnormal movements or fall of an individual. This sensor is connected to an electronic card that processes the signal from patient movement .

The FloorInMotion system Tarkett has a direct connection with the alert system, which helps prevent backup in case of fall and intervene promptly in case of problems . Tarkett also thought to provide a discrete monitoring service for caregivers , accessible computer ( tablet or smartphone ) that keeps track of patient activities without infringing on the privacy of residents.

For health care teams , it is a relief to know that incidents will be quickly identified. In case of a fall , medical teams can intervene immediately and bring relief faster , reducing the effects on the health of residents .

floorinmotion
Availability

Floor In Motion is the result of an ambitious program of the Department of Research & Innovation Tarkett , expertise in health and conducted numerous partnerships with hospitals, nursing homes and universities. The Tarkett Group has expanded its area of ​​expertise in developing in-house expertise in specific electronic and connected objects .

Floor in motion is primarily marketed to health institutions at the end of 2014 in Europe and North America.

Tarkett: http://www.tarkett.com

Shodan the search engine of connected objects

shodan

Made in USA, Shodan is a search engine that can identify all connected objects (webcams, automation tools, robots, hydro, IT companies …), but also to take control. An application that allows you to become aware of the risks of piracy, some will say. Which encourages hackers, say others.

The year-old site known as Shodan makes it easy to locate internet-facing SCADA, or supervisory control and data acquisition, systems used to control equipment at gasoline refineries, power plants and other industrial facilities. As white-hat hacker and Errata Security CEO Robert Graham explains, the search engine can also be used to identify systems with known vulnerabilities.

Besides opening up industrial systems to attacks that target unpatched vulnerabilities, the information provided by Shodan makes networks more vulnerable to brute-force attacks on passwords, many of which may still use factory defaults, CERT warned. The organization advised admins to tighten security by:

  • Placing all control systems assets behind firewalls, separated from the business network
  • Deploying secure remote access methods such as Virtual Private Networks (VPNs) for remote access
  • Removing, disabling, or renaming any default system accounts (where possible)
  • Implementing account lockout policies to reduce the risk from brute forcing attempts
  • Implementing policies requiring the use of strong passwords
  • Monitoring the creation of administrator level accounts by third-party vendors

Short for Sentient Hyper-Optimized Data Access Network, Shodan contains a wealth of information about routers, servers, load balancers and other hardware attached to the internet. Its database was built by indexing metadata contained in the headers the hardware broadcasts to other devices. Searches can be filtered by port, hostname and country.

Innovation about security will become more and more important, more costly, to take in account in the management of all the companies SI.

http://www.shodanhq.com/

How to innovate to reduce discrimination against women

SalaryHerHis

Is there really a discrimination again women?

The film shows what kind of images are showed by some commercial medias. The film showed American medias but in all industrialize countries, we can found these movies that gives this women’s vision.

Beyond medias, is there really some discriminations against women, and especially in industrialised countries ? Simple fact allows us to see the evidence; in Europe, in Russia and Australia, Women are less paid from 17% in comparison with Men, in United States 19%, in UK 21%, in Japan 33% and in Korea 38%. There is no country without any discrimination against women but Scandinavian and New Zealand countries have low discriminations.

But there are other discriminations that have higher consequence.

What are the ratio of Women who have Top Board responsibility?

The best, in Norway, 39% of Board seats are attributed to Women. In USA, 15,7%, in France, 12,7%, in UK, 12,5% and in Germany 11,2%. In the BRICST countries, Brazil, 5,1%, Russia 5,9%, India 5,3%, China 8,5%, South Africa 15,8% and Turkey 10,8%.

Women managers are 20% less paid that men in France; average salary discrimination is around 17% for all categories of Women jobs. Higher the level in the hierarchy is, higher the inequality is.

Anyway, progress is there but the equality will be long to obtain in the current trend…

In 1980, 25% of managers were female; in 2010, 38%.

25% of worldwide countries have legal restrictions on women’s right to work. There is some reductions of restrictions, decade after decade.

Around the world, almost 20% of national parliamentary seats are now occupied by women, up from 17.2% five years ago.

It will take more than 50 years in the current trend to reduce completely the discrimination against women. Can we accelerate the trend? It is up to all of us, women and men to be informed and to make some concrete actions to reduce them.

Check this very interesting blog with a lot of statistics about women’s discrimination

http://filipspagnoli.wordpress.com/stats-on-human-rights/statistics-on-discrimination/statistics-on-discrimination-of-women/#2

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MENA: environment for innovation & entrepreneurship

 mena innovation and entrepreneurship

Version Française

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Launching a sustainable business goes well beyond learning how to draft a business plan or fill out a financing application.

It involves a range of skills, both “hard” and “soft”, such as managing a start-up enterprise, motivating employees, assembling a cohesive team, tailoring a product to a well-defined market, adapting rapidly to fast-changing circumstances and consumer sentiment, and understanding how to convert an interesting technology into a viable business. These skills are not acquired, and nor can businesses succeed, in a vacuum. They need a business “ecosystem”, where potential entrepreneurs can learn the right skills and innovation is both encouraged and nurtured. For the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), this will require a change in the cultural attitude toward entrepreneurship.

Nascent ecosystem emerging in MENA

A nascent ecosystem has been emerging in MENA over the past five years. The few businesses that have achieved success in this evolving environment were private sector led, usually by members of the diaspora or those who had either studied or started a business abroad. These individuals come equipped with access to international networks and markets and they have clear incentives to see their ventures succeed. They invest their time as well as their money; key ingredients for a successful business ecosystem that need to be further encouraged. Governments need to know that strengthening innovation-led growth entails understanding and promoting investments in research and development (R&D), cultivating the necessary skills, putting in place a functional and effective business environment and the mechanisms to foster private and public collaboration.

Two initiatives from World Bank

The World Bank has launched two initiatives to support the fledgling ecosystem and help foster innovation and entrepreneurship in MENA. “Supporting the Ecosystem for Fostering a Dynamic Entrepreneurship” is funded by a Bank Development Grant Facility that supports regional partnerships for development. The program leverages a partnership between two leading regional incubators Oasis500 and Wamda to boost the support they already provide to pre and early start-ups across the region. In addition to expanding mentorship, skills development and access to investors, the incubators will also engage stakeholders (governments, universities, investors, other incubators) in each country as a means of expanding the partnership and broadening the transfer and exchange of critical knowledge and skills. Outreach is an important component and will include dissemination of success stories and “lessons learned.” To ensure they reach a diverse audience, a variety of media and platforms will be used, such as popular web sites, an Arabic Entrepreneurship Newsletter, comics, info graphics, cartoons and videos. Particular attention will be paid to rural areas and to groups who tend not to see themselves as entrepreneurs, such as women and youth. The Bank continues to seek funding and partnerships with other entities that have a track record of supporting entrepreneurship and building this capacity in the region.

The second initiative works at the policy level. The World Bank, the private sector, academia, think tanks, civil society experts and governments formed a community of practitioners to cultivate change through innovation and technology. “The How-to of Innovation, Technology and Entrepreneurship” (ITE) was launched last year in Prague. It is a practitioners’ exchange, networking and learning activity. Its goal is to help countries in the region advance policies that promote the various elements required for a thriving, innovative economy. It provides an opportunity for the exchange of operational lessons from other countries on the “how” of public support in this area.

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Big Data: PRISM by Numbers

The Washington Post reported that the government’s monitoring of American’s data goes much, much deeper. The FBI and the National Security Agency are mining the servers of the country’s biggest technology companies for the purpose of hunting spies and terrorists. The program, code-named PRISM, is massive in scope and involves web services that many Americans use every day.

  1644251-le-controle-par-la-pensee-comment-ca-marche

NUI: Brain Computer Interface

Control games by thought, be able to walk in a virtual world just by imagining his movements make clear the blurred image of a screen just by focusing: it is no longer science fiction but the real science today. And perhaps these brain-computer (or BCI for “Brain Computer Interfaces”) interfaces become commonplace tomorrow.

  TOP6 - Social Media

Social Media: how to Innovate?

Did you know that there are more devices connected to the internet than there are people on the entire planet? This global pipeline of data keeps the world connected, and nowhere is its presence is felt more strongly than in social media. Every minute of the day tens of thousands of tweets are exchanged on Twitter and hundreds of thousands of pieces of content are posted to Facebook.

  Google's_Lexus_RX_450h_Self-Driving_Car

Google: Where we are on “Driverless car”?

The Google driverless car is a project by Google that involves developing technology for driverless cars. The project is currently being led by Google engineer Sebastian Thrun, director of the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory and co-inventor of Google Street View.

  google-augmented-reality-glasses-project-glass-0

Google: Where we are on “Glass”?

Google Glass is a mobile solution that could replace SmartPhones. Google is thinking to put it on the market in 2014. These glasses are displaying information from Internet superimposed on the classical view which is a solution respecting the principle of augmented reality.

  20130506-083017.jpg

Is Innovation overrated?

On the web, we can read articles saying that companies & people overrated Innovation. Arguments are clear: consumers that would like some products do not especially want innovative products. These consumers need very good products, with the right price… It seems to be absolutely true, isn’t it?

  20130504-191421.jpg

1Q13: Why PC down -14% vs 1Q12

Worldwide PC shipments totaled 76.3 million units in the first quarter of 2013 (1Q13), down -13.9% compared to the same quarter in 2012 and worse than the forecast decline of -7.7%, according to the International Data Corporation (IDC) Worldwide Quarterly PC Tracker.

  20130430-083726.jpg

NGINX: host 12% of the world’s websites

For being the server to web stars. Between WordPress, Hulu, Netflix, Pinterest and Wikipedia, Nginx hosts about 12% of the world’s more than 630 millon websites and gained about 2 million new hostnames in December 2012.

  MindMap

TOP20 to Boost Your Creativity

Creativity is all about finding new ways of solving problems and approaching situations. This isn’t a skill restricted to artists, musicians or writers; it is a useful skill for people from all walks of life. If you’ve ever wanted to boost your creativity, these tips can help.

  WomenITUSA

Why is there less women in IT

In the early 1980s, women accounted for just over 37% of all US college students earning bachelor’s degrees in computer science. By 2010, that percentage had fallen to a little more than 17%, according to latest available data from the National Science Foundation.