Archive | April 2014

1Q14: PC market share declines from 1,7% vs 1Q13

PC market share 1Q14

Worldwide PC shipments totaled 76.6 million units in the first quarter of 2014, a 1.7 percent decline from the first quarter of 2013, according to preliminary results by Gartner. The severity of the decline eased compared with the past seven quarters.

All regions indicated a positive effect since the end of XP support stimulated the PC refresh of XP systems. Professional desktops, in particular, showed strength in the quarter. Among key countries, Japan was greatly affected by the end of XP support, registering a 35 percent year-over-year increase in PC shipments. The growth was also boosted by sales tax change. We expect the impact of XP migration worldwide to continue throughout 2014

While the PC market remains weak, it is showing signs of improvement compared to last year. The PC professional market generally improved in regions such as EMEA. The U.S. saw the gradual recovery of PC spending as the impact of tablets faded.

The PC market continued to be tough for many vendors. Economies of scale matter tremendously in this high-volume, low-profit market, which is forcing some vendors, such as Sony, out of the market. In contrast, all of the top five vendors, except Acer, registered year-over-year shipment growth. The top thee vendors — Lenovo, HP and Dell — have all confirmed the importance of the PC business as part of their overall business strategies.

Lenovo experienced the strongest growth among the top five vendors. Its shipments grew 10.9 percent and Lenovo extended its position as the worldwide leader. The company’s shipments grew in all regions except Asia/Pacific, where growth in China has been problematic. Overall, the China market again slowed, in part due to the long holiday in the middle of the quarter.

Digital lollipop simulates taste without eating

Digital Lollipop

Made in Singapore, still in laboratory development, digital pacifier will introduce a new meaning on the Internet: the taste. Using electrodes, it is indeed capable of transmitting the language all the taste pallet: bitter sweet, salty, sour. “Why not tomorrow discover behind his computer taste dishes prepared in Top Chef?” Other applications considered: appease “virtually” a sugar craving for the regime, educate people to new flavors …

DIGITAL LOLLIPOP (Singapour) VF – Forum…

TASTING all the ice cream you want and not getting fat? It sounds too good to be true. But researchers from the National University of Singapore have developed a ‘digital lollipop’ that allows users to simulate taste – without a calorie passing their lips, The New York Times reports.

While it sounds complicated, the technology behind the node is actually quite simple, according to engineering scholar Nimesha Ranasinghe who pioneered the project.

Small changes in vibration and temperature produce a sweet, salty, sour and bitter taste on the users tongue.

The aim is to eventually have flavours available through smartphones or televisions that could allow users to share dinner with their favourite movie characters or taste a product before they buy.

But your iPhone hasn’t turned into a Snickers just yet.

Researchers are still working out how to produce complex flavours and develop the all important texture and smell in order to trick the brain into believing it’s real.

Shodan the search engine of connected objects

shodan

Made in USA, Shodan is a search engine that can identify all connected objects (webcams, automation tools, robots, hydro, IT companies …), but also to take control. An application that allows you to become aware of the risks of piracy, some will say. Which encourages hackers, say others.

The year-old site known as Shodan makes it easy to locate internet-facing SCADA, or supervisory control and data acquisition, systems used to control equipment at gasoline refineries, power plants and other industrial facilities. As white-hat hacker and Errata Security CEO Robert Graham explains, the search engine can also be used to identify systems with known vulnerabilities.

Besides opening up industrial systems to attacks that target unpatched vulnerabilities, the information provided by Shodan makes networks more vulnerable to brute-force attacks on passwords, many of which may still use factory defaults, CERT warned. The organization advised admins to tighten security by:

  • Placing all control systems assets behind firewalls, separated from the business network
  • Deploying secure remote access methods such as Virtual Private Networks (VPNs) for remote access
  • Removing, disabling, or renaming any default system accounts (where possible)
  • Implementing account lockout policies to reduce the risk from brute forcing attempts
  • Implementing policies requiring the use of strong passwords
  • Monitoring the creation of administrator level accounts by third-party vendors

Short for Sentient Hyper-Optimized Data Access Network, Shodan contains a wealth of information about routers, servers, load balancers and other hardware attached to the internet. Its database was built by indexing metadata contained in the headers the hardware broadcasts to other devices. Searches can be filtered by port, hostname and country.

Innovation about security will become more and more important, more costly, to take in account in the management of all the companies SI.

http://www.shodanhq.com/